Monthly Archives: October 2015

Have You Made A Pop-Up?

October 20th 2015

This is a Pop-up.  A fun little contraption that won’t stay down (unless you use your ties or elastic) It is so versatile it has tons of uses. Garbage caddy (with a bag) in the car, in a room, a catch all for toys, sewing notions, fat quarters, hair clips, candy, socks…you make it whatever you want! I can see how making these can easily become an addiction. My friend Jo from The Fat Quarter Gypsy invented these and they are “hot” right now. Check out the video on her facebook page.

jo's pop ups

If you want one for you, you can visit Whoopsa Daisy Farm online shop. There is the pattern with three different size pop-ups and the cost of the metal form spring sold as a refill.

If you want some for your shop Checkers has them!

You can also get really creative. See how well my patterns can turn into a pop-up?

Ducky Pop Up Fishy 1

peppermint 1

Instruction sheets to adapt my patterns to come out soon. She is debuting those at Market.

So go on, make yourself a Pop-up!

 



Scrappy Christmas Trees

October 10th 2015

Some scraps are just to pretty to toss, some might argue, “what can you do with such a small scrap?” Well today, I am going to show you how to make a scrappy Christmas tree.

Scrappy Christmas tree sachet

You can make it into a sachet, a pillow to hang on a door knob or an ornament. So gather your scraps, here we go!

As I sew, I like to tuck my tiniest scraps, greater than an inch, into labeled baggies so I know what line it is. The larger scraps are cut into certain sizes, but that’s for another day.

scrappy christmas tree 1 (2)

Here I have my designer scraps and some left over neutral strips.
Arrange your scraps smallest to largest like a wedding cake. 🙂

scrappy Christmas tree 4

Center the smaller piece with the larger piece, eyeball it.

scrappy Christmas tree 5

Sew the pieces together using 1/4 inch seam.

scrappy Christmas tree 5a

Cut your “cakes” into triangles, no special rulers needed! Center your cake on the cutting mat so there is a line down the center of the block.

scrappy Christmas tree 6 (2)

Cut from the center line diagonally to the corner of the last piece.

scrappy Christmas tree 7 (2)

Align your trees along a neutral strip, leaving at least 1 inch above and below ends of the triangle.

scrappy Christmas tree 8 (2)

Press, repeat on the other side. Scrappy Christmas tree 9a (2)

To trim your blocks, cut down the widest point where top and bottom strips align. A minimum of 1/4 inch is ideal but not necessary.

scrappy Christmas tree 11 (2)

See below how this “fat” tree has no extra 1/4 inch. (It will be okay!)

scrappy Christmas tree 10

Once sides are trimmed, trim the bottom of the tree.

scrappy Christmas tree 11a

Aren’t they festive?

scrappy Christmas tree 11b

Make trunk units. Trunk unit is a 1 1/2 inch square. Add neutral scrap to either side guess-timating the size of your block.

scrappy Christmas tree 12 (2)

I did it slightly bigger and trimmed.

scrappy Christmas tree 12a

After trimming, add stabilizer, either Shape Flex, interfacing or whatever else may be at hand. Sometimes it’s just a neutral piece of fabric (I like an extra layer between when I am using the Balsam Fir)

scrappy Christmas tree 13 (2)

Follow instructions suggested by package instructions for whatever stabilizer you are using. Trim as desired. When trimming I leave about 1/2 inch from the top of the tree so when it’s stuffed, the shape is not lost.

scrappy Christmas tree 14a

Cut a pretty backing piece and a neutral piece (or more stabilizer) about 1/4 inch larger than the front. In case you are worried about the tree on the right being imperfect, don’t. 🙂

scrappy Christmas tree 14

If you want to add any embellishments, do it before stitching the layers together. I added beads in the same color as the fabric for a little subtle bling-y effect.

scrappy Christmas tree 13a (2)

scrappy Christmas tree 13b

To assemble your tree, pin a ribbon in the center of the tree for hanging later.

scrappy Christmas tree 15

With right sides together, pin everything in place, aligning the bottom.

scrappy Christmas tree 16

Leaving a 2 inch opening, start sewing (back stitch to secure) with 1/4 inch seam (from front fabric not backing) all the way to the other side, DON”T STOP AT CORNER AND TURN YOUR SQUARE. I used the method for making corners suggested by Sew Mama Sew in this video. Sew all the way to the the end of fabric.

scrappy Christmas tree 18

Remove from machine and trim off the excess. Fold the sewn seam at stitching and start your next stitch there, back stitching a little to secure.

scrappy Christmas tree 17 (2)

scrappy Christmas tree 18 (2)

When all sides are done and you back stitched at the opening, turn and press. Push out corners with something with a point. I used a wooden skewer.

scrappy Christmas tree 20

You can fill with Balsam Fir, available here (or other scenty substance) or poly-fil.

scrappy Christmas tree 21

When using the Balsam Fir, I finish off the last bit of filling with some poly-fil for a clean finish.

scrappy Christmas tree 22

Hand stitch the bottom closed.

scrappy christmas tree

If you rather not stuff, use batting instead of stabilizer between front and  back. Quilt the top decoratively if you are turning it out or quilt as a sandwich if you will or finish it off with binding like a quilt.